Stephen D. McCormick

Principal Investigator

Adjunct Full Professor at University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA

I am interested in the environmental and hormonal control of osmoregulation, development, growth and reproduction in fish. Much of this work is applied to the conservation and restoration of anadromous fish. Recent research includes four major areas: 1) Hormonal control of salinity tolerance and mechanisms of ion transport in anadromous fish (salmon, alewife, shad, sturgeon and lamprey); 2) Environmental regulation of migratory behavior and physiology in anadromous fish; 3) Disruption of normal development by contaminants, including endocrine disruptors and acidification); 4) Impact of temperature on stress, growth and migration in brook trout and Atlantic salmon.

phone: (413) 863 3804

email: mccormick@umext.umass.edu

Curriculum Vitae

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Amy M. Regish

Physiologist

I am broadly interested in the physiologic response of anadromous fish species to natural and anthropogenic alterations of aquatic ecosystems. Some of the many challenges faced by anadromous fish species are from warming temperatures due to climate change, manmade impediments to migration, and contaminant exposure. The impact of these perturbations on thermal tolerance, stress physiology, and osmoregulation is of particular concern in the conservation and restoration efforts directed towards anadromous fish species in the Northeast. Research to help develop an understanding the physiological responses will help in these efforts.

phone: (413) 863 3809

email: aregish@usgs.gov

Curriculum Vitae

 

Daniel Hall

Biological Technician

There are more species of fish than all other lineages of vertebrates combined. With all this diversity, it is no wonder that the taxonomic positions of many groups are still highly debated. I am most interested in applying classic techniques like morphometrics along with more modern molecular approaches to better understand the evolution of these animals.

phone: (413) 863 3812

email: djhall@usgs.gov 

Curriculum Vitae

 
 

Lian W. Guo

Doctoral Candidate
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

My research examines how temperature and food availability affect the ecophysiology of juvenile river herring in New England watersheds. I aim to use my findings to understand mechanisms underlying ongoing climate-driven range shifts in both river herring species. Previously, I have worked at NOAA's Southwest Fisheries Science Center, using genetics to describe rockfish biogeography. I earned a B.A. in Organismal Biology at Scripps College, where I completed a thesis on thermal tolerance of the intertidal barnacle B. glandula. My research interests include fish ecophysiology, thermal ecology, environmental toxicology, and human-fish interactions.

phone: (413) 863 3833

email: lguo@umass.edu

Curriculum Vitae

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Currently, I am a doctoral candidate in the Organismic and Evolutionary Biology program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst (anticipated defense 2022, Amherst, MA). My research focusing on seawater tolerance and feeding behavior in anadromous and landlocked lamprey has been conducted under the advisement of Dr. Stephen D. McCormick at the USGS Conte Anadromous Research Center, Turners Falls, MA. I have earned a B.Sc. in Marine Biology and a B.Sc. in Environmental Science, both from the University of New Haven, West Haven, CT under the advisement of Dr. John T. Kelly. My research interests include comparative physiology, particularly in osmoregulation and appetite regulation. 

phone: (413) 863 3828

email: jnorstog@umass.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Doctoral Candidate
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA

Jessica L. Norstog